Author, Actor, Teacher, Trouble

YA author of DON'T TOUCH, my debut novel out from HarperTeen September 2, 2014. WHAT?

Here I collect inspirations, obsessions, and fever dreams ... Peruse at your own risk. And check out the menu for secrets and project-specific dreamings.
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erikadprice:

On Sunday, I whipped through the entirety of rachelmwilson's new YA novel, Don’t Touch, published by HarperTeen. And since this is such a substantial and meaty young adult novel (clocking in at 432 pages), that is definitely saying something. 
Full disclosure: I know Rachel in real life, and I admire her a lot. 
Don’t Touch follows anxious high school student Caddie Finn as she navigates two major life changes: attending a new school (an arts academy, where she’ll be pursuing acting), and dealing with the emotional fallout of her parents’ recent separation. Caddie has a history of panic attacks, ritualized coping behaviors, and magical thinking — all OCD symptoms — and when her father moves out, they come back with a vengeance. This time, Caddie becomes convinced that if she touches another person’s skin — anyone at all, for any amount of time — her father will be gone for good. 
Caddie copes with her new compulsion by wearing long sleeves and jeans, even in the stifling Alabama summer, jumping away in fear the moment a person approaches her body, and oh yeah…wearing elbow-length lavender gloves. Every day. For months. 
The book dives into Caddie’s high school transition and her coping with mental illness pretty quickly; the entire plot of the book moves at a nice, steady clip without ever feeling rushed or belabored, which I really appreciated. 
The reader is quickly introduced to Caddie’s new classmates, all of whom are actors in her program: there’s Mandy, her long-lost childhood friend; Drew, Mandy’s meat-headed boyfriend; Peter, the astoundingly patient and understanding love interest who can also act the hell out of Hamlet; Livia & Hank, the quirky, platonic couple consisting of a gay boy and a straight (?) girl; and Oscar, the sexually harassing, loud mouthed former child actor. 
Caddie’s new school is putting on a production of Hamlet, and Caddie desperately wants to play the role of Ophelia. But when she gets the role and her crush Peter gets Hamlet (don’t worry, this happens fairly early in the book), her “don’t touch" rule becomes a lot more difficult to maintain. And to hide from others. 
I won’t go any further into the plot, but let’s just say this book explores numerous interesting conflicts. First there’s Caddie’s attempts to overcome her own mental illness. Then there’s her fraught relationship with her absent father, and her parents’ crumbling marriage. There’s Caddie (and all the other students’) stress over putting on the best possible play. There’s Caddie’s frantic, deeply misguided attempts to conceal her OCD from everyone in her life, which constantly places her acting career and her friendships at risk. And finally, there’s Caddie’s internal struggle over her deep attraction to Peter, and her conflicted desire to break the don’t touch rule. 
This book has a lot of ideas to juggle, and it does so expertly. Did I mention that it also gets really in depth about what attending an acting high school is like, and seriously grapples with Shakespeare? Yeah. This is not a fluffy YA read. It’s got a lot for the reader to chew on, even if they’re not the typical romance/YA reader. 
Don’t Touch isn’t, after all, a romance. It’s an informative, literary tale about overcoming OCD and learning to accept help from friends (and yes, from mental health professionals). That the book also paints such reasonable, accurate portraits of adolescent relationships is just a fantastic bonus. Nothing is fantastical or problematic here — we witness fights and break ups and frustrations and effective communication — exactly what an adolescent reader needs to see. 
Finally, Don’t Touch ends with an amazing (and thoroughly researched) author’s note that I am certain will really help a bundle of young adults and adolescents with OCD, and tons of adults and teens with other mental illnesses, too. Rachel has mentioned in multiple interviews that she had her own experiences that were comparable (if not identical) to Caddie’s, and her firsthand experience with anxiety and panic attacks is a huge part of what makes this novel so important as a piece of fiction, and as disability and mental illness representation. 
If you like YA, novels about mental illness or invisible disabilities, books about acting, Shakespeare references, or responsible, accurate romance, Don’t Touch is 100% for you. Pick it up wherever you buy your books — Amazon, B&N, Kobo, local book stores, etc etc etc. 

I’m honored by this review from the whipsmart Erika Price, whom I know for reals.
erikadprice:

On Sunday, I whipped through the entirety of rachelmwilson's new YA novel, Don’t Touch, published by HarperTeen. And since this is such a substantial and meaty young adult novel (clocking in at 432 pages), that is definitely saying something. 
Full disclosure: I know Rachel in real life, and I admire her a lot. 
Don’t Touch follows anxious high school student Caddie Finn as she navigates two major life changes: attending a new school (an arts academy, where she’ll be pursuing acting), and dealing with the emotional fallout of her parents’ recent separation. Caddie has a history of panic attacks, ritualized coping behaviors, and magical thinking — all OCD symptoms — and when her father moves out, they come back with a vengeance. This time, Caddie becomes convinced that if she touches another person’s skin — anyone at all, for any amount of time — her father will be gone for good. 
Caddie copes with her new compulsion by wearing long sleeves and jeans, even in the stifling Alabama summer, jumping away in fear the moment a person approaches her body, and oh yeah…wearing elbow-length lavender gloves. Every day. For months. 
The book dives into Caddie’s high school transition and her coping with mental illness pretty quickly; the entire plot of the book moves at a nice, steady clip without ever feeling rushed or belabored, which I really appreciated. 
The reader is quickly introduced to Caddie’s new classmates, all of whom are actors in her program: there’s Mandy, her long-lost childhood friend; Drew, Mandy’s meat-headed boyfriend; Peter, the astoundingly patient and understanding love interest who can also act the hell out of Hamlet; Livia & Hank, the quirky, platonic couple consisting of a gay boy and a straight (?) girl; and Oscar, the sexually harassing, loud mouthed former child actor. 
Caddie’s new school is putting on a production of Hamlet, and Caddie desperately wants to play the role of Ophelia. But when she gets the role and her crush Peter gets Hamlet (don’t worry, this happens fairly early in the book), her “don’t touch" rule becomes a lot more difficult to maintain. And to hide from others. 
I won’t go any further into the plot, but let’s just say this book explores numerous interesting conflicts. First there’s Caddie’s attempts to overcome her own mental illness. Then there’s her fraught relationship with her absent father, and her parents’ crumbling marriage. There’s Caddie (and all the other students’) stress over putting on the best possible play. There’s Caddie’s frantic, deeply misguided attempts to conceal her OCD from everyone in her life, which constantly places her acting career and her friendships at risk. And finally, there’s Caddie’s internal struggle over her deep attraction to Peter, and her conflicted desire to break the don’t touch rule. 
This book has a lot of ideas to juggle, and it does so expertly. Did I mention that it also gets really in depth about what attending an acting high school is like, and seriously grapples with Shakespeare? Yeah. This is not a fluffy YA read. It’s got a lot for the reader to chew on, even if they’re not the typical romance/YA reader. 
Don’t Touch isn’t, after all, a romance. It’s an informative, literary tale about overcoming OCD and learning to accept help from friends (and yes, from mental health professionals). That the book also paints such reasonable, accurate portraits of adolescent relationships is just a fantastic bonus. Nothing is fantastical or problematic here — we witness fights and break ups and frustrations and effective communication — exactly what an adolescent reader needs to see. 
Finally, Don’t Touch ends with an amazing (and thoroughly researched) author’s note that I am certain will really help a bundle of young adults and adolescents with OCD, and tons of adults and teens with other mental illnesses, too. Rachel has mentioned in multiple interviews that she had her own experiences that were comparable (if not identical) to Caddie’s, and her firsthand experience with anxiety and panic attacks is a huge part of what makes this novel so important as a piece of fiction, and as disability and mental illness representation. 
If you like YA, novels about mental illness or invisible disabilities, books about acting, Shakespeare references, or responsible, accurate romance, Don’t Touch is 100% for you. Pick it up wherever you buy your books — Amazon, B&N, Kobo, local book stores, etc etc etc. 

I’m honored by this review from the whipsmart Erika Price, whom I know for reals.

erikadprice:

On Sunday, I whipped through the entirety of rachelmwilson's new YA novel, Don’t Touch, published by HarperTeen. And since this is such a substantial and meaty young adult novel (clocking in at 432 pages), that is definitely saying something. 

Full disclosure: I know Rachel in real life, and I admire her a lot. 

Don’t Touch follows anxious high school student Caddie Finn as she navigates two major life changes: attending a new school (an arts academy, where she’ll be pursuing acting), and dealing with the emotional fallout of her parents’ recent separation. Caddie has a history of panic attacks, ritualized coping behaviors, and magical thinking — all OCD symptoms — and when her father moves out, they come back with a vengeance. This time, Caddie becomes convinced that if she touches another person’s skin — anyone at all, for any amount of time — her father will be gone for good. 

Caddie copes with her new compulsion by wearing long sleeves and jeans, even in the stifling Alabama summer, jumping away in fear the moment a person approaches her body, and oh yeah…wearing elbow-length lavender gloves. Every day. For months. 

The book dives into Caddie’s high school transition and her coping with mental illness pretty quickly; the entire plot of the book moves at a nice, steady clip without ever feeling rushed or belabored, which I really appreciated. 

The reader is quickly introduced to Caddie’s new classmates, all of whom are actors in her program: there’s Mandy, her long-lost childhood friend; Drew, Mandy’s meat-headed boyfriend; Peter, the astoundingly patient and understanding love interest who can also act the hell out of Hamlet; Livia & Hank, the quirky, platonic couple consisting of a gay boy and a straight (?) girl; and Oscar, the sexually harassing, loud mouthed former child actor. 

Caddie’s new school is putting on a production of Hamlet, and Caddie desperately wants to play the role of Ophelia. But when she gets the role and her crush Peter gets Hamlet (don’t worry, this happens fairly early in the book), her “don’t touch" rule becomes a lot more difficult to maintain. And to hide from others. 

I won’t go any further into the plot, but let’s just say this book explores numerous interesting conflicts. First there’s Caddie’s attempts to overcome her own mental illness. Then there’s her fraught relationship with her absent father, and her parents’ crumbling marriage. There’s Caddie (and all the other students’) stress over putting on the best possible play. There’s Caddie’s frantic, deeply misguided attempts to conceal her OCD from everyone in her life, which constantly places her acting career and her friendships at risk. And finally, there’s Caddie’s internal struggle over her deep attraction to Peter, and her conflicted desire to break the don’t touch rule. 

This book has a lot of ideas to juggle, and it does so expertly. Did I mention that it also gets really in depth about what attending an acting high school is like, and seriously grapples with Shakespeare? Yeah. This is not a fluffy YA read. It’s got a lot for the reader to chew on, even if they’re not the typical romance/YA reader. 

Don’t Touch isn’t, after all, a romance. It’s an informative, literary tale about overcoming OCD and learning to accept help from friends (and yes, from mental health professionals). That the book also paints such reasonable, accurate portraits of adolescent relationships is just a fantastic bonus. Nothing is fantastical or problematic here — we witness fights and break ups and frustrations and effective communication — exactly what an adolescent reader needs to see. 

Finally, Don’t Touch ends with an amazing (and thoroughly researched) author’s note that I am certain will really help a bundle of young adults and adolescents with OCD, and tons of adults and teens with other mental illnesses, too. Rachel has mentioned in multiple interviews that she had her own experiences that were comparable (if not identical) to Caddie’s, and her firsthand experience with anxiety and panic attacks is a huge part of what makes this novel so important as a piece of fiction, and as disability and mental illness representation. 

If you like YA, novels about mental illness or invisible disabilities, books about acting, Shakespeare references, or responsible, accurate romance, Don’t Touch is 100% for you. Pick it up wherever you buy your books — Amazon, B&N, Kobo, local book stores, etc etc etc. 

I’m honored by this review from the whipsmart Erika Price, whom I know for reals.

The Official DON’T TOUCH Book Trailer Is Here!!!

DIrected by Matt Miller, starring Mia Hulen and Brando Crawford, and with amazing music by Christian Moder and vocals by Katie Todd

fashion-by-the-book:

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson 

Genre- Young Adult

Publisher- Harper Teen

Release Date- September 2nd 2014

Rating-

I received a copy of this book in exchanged for a honest review. In no way did the author or publishing company influence my review. For info on my book reviews and rating scale, click here



Let’s use a John Green quote to sum my love of this book up “Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.”

(I’m probably freaking the author out right now with my love of this book, but this is my job so…) I really, really loved this book. Whenever I have contact with an author, I always panic a little about if I didn’t like the book, what would I say? Thankfully, I didn’t have this problem here. Maybe the opposite, since I really liked it. Let’s get down to the basic of why: I have anxiety issues. I don’t talk about it much here because I try to be professional (as you can tell from my obsessive use of David Tennant gifs…) but I do, and this book seemed to really get anxiety, how when you know what you’re doing doesn’t make sense but you keep doing it because you afraid not to.

Caddie has rules. Don’t blink unless you want to crash, keep holding your breath, don’t touch anyone or dad won’t come back. She’s always had anxiety, but since her parents separated and her dad practically left her life, it’s gotten worse. She’s afraid to touch anyone, wearing long sleeves and scarves in the south’s summer heat. When she starts school as a Art-based high school, she quickly gains friends, including an old one, Mandy, and is cast in her dream role in Hamlet. But her fear gets in her way, stopping her from touching anyone, even Peter, the possibly crazy but still cute boy who likes her.

Oh, Caddie. Poor baby! She’s the kind of character you want to shield away from the world and make her hot chocolate and never let her get hurt. (also, props to a main character who I actually like!) And her friends; I seriously loved her friends. They were quirky and funny and cool and realistic. And her school sounded so amazing. I’ve always wished there was a school like that near me (I love homeschooling, but a school with possible fashion and writing programs wins!)

And PETER. Man, I loved him. I loved how he’s part of the reason she slowly came out of her fears, and I loved how their relationship progressed. Caddie and Peter worked well together, I hate when couples in books are weird, with one being perfect and the other not-so-much, or when one is life-like and the other is flat. They were both realistic and equal.

The issues in this book are handled beautifully. It’s hard to write about a subject that affects so many, but Wilson does it well. The writing itself is lovely and tells the story clearly. And I loved that they were doing Hamlet. Ophelia’s story had always interested me, and I liked seeing Caddie’s view of it.

I’m trying to think of any problems I had with this book… hmmm… With great characters, plot, and writing, it’s hard to think of any. You know how some people treat Perks of Being A Wallflower like the best book ever to be written, because they can relate to Charlie and his life? I can relate to Caddie’s, so this is like my own perks. I guess I would have liked to know a bit more about Mandy, she seemed so interesting.

Anyways, read this book if you ever feel alone because of a inner issue, or if you love Laurie Halse Anderson’s Wintergirls, Speak, ect. (sorry this review is all over the place!)

Watch out for a giveaway inspired by Don’t Touch!

Anonymous asked:
do you know any good ya books where the protagonist has ocd? Preferably where it's not portrayed as a joke ? Thanks :)
Rachel M. Wilson

The recently released Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson has come highly recommended to me by several friends with OCD. We interviewed the author last month and will feature a review later this year. 

We have several other books featuring characters with OCD listed on our Goodreads account: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/22364883?shelf=ocd

However, the only book of those we’ve reviewed on Disability in Kidlit is Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern. I haven’t heard anything about how well the condition is portrayed in the other books—anyone with OCD want to chip in?

herreracus:

Eagerly awaiting the release of FAT & BONES by Larissa Theule. I’ve had the extreme pleasure of reading one of the stories in my first ever VCFA workshop and it was fantastic. Can’t wait to read all the other stories!

Me. Too! I want to give it to all the small children I know, knowing their parents will love it too.
herreracus:

Eagerly awaiting the release of FAT & BONES by Larissa Theule. I’ve had the extreme pleasure of reading one of the stories in my first ever VCFA workshop and it was fantastic. Can’t wait to read all the other stories!

Me. Too! I want to give it to all the small children I know, knowing their parents will love it too.
herreracus:

Eagerly awaiting the release of FAT & BONES by Larissa Theule. I’ve had the extreme pleasure of reading one of the stories in my first ever VCFA workshop and it was fantastic. Can’t wait to read all the other stories!

Me. Too! I want to give it to all the small children I know, knowing their parents will love it too.

herreracus:

Eagerly awaiting the release of FAT & BONES by Larissa Theule. I’ve had the extreme pleasure of reading one of the stories in my first ever VCFA workshop and it was fantastic. Can’t wait to read all the other stories!

Me. Too! I want to give it to all the small children I know, knowing their parents will love it too.

herreracus:

BOOK TRAILER TIME

When my friend Amy and I were in high school, we made silly little stop-motion animations using cut-out paper. Amy had a camera and we both had ambition.

TEN YEARS LATER we have reunited to make this book trailer! Amy lives relatively close to me and we visit with each other often. When I asked if she was interested in making another animation (knowing how the previous ones had taken us the better part of a whole day each), she was as excited as I was! YAY!

I had written a song for the book trailer, but it turned out to be a bit, uh, depressing. (My singing voice is pretty low, and also I guess I like sad-sounding songs. I’ll post the song another time.) Luckily, Amy’s brother Michael is a composer and was able to take my song and make a much happier (and, let’s face it, way better-sounding) version of it.

This was a really hard trailer to figure out! I eventually decided to showcase all the characters (at least the important, non-spoilery ones), because I think they’re the best part of this book.

OKAY, now, if you haven’t already, you should watch the trailer! And if you end up reading the book, you should come back and watch it AGAIN because it makes slightly more sense after you’ve read the book. :)

I may have reblogged this before, but yes, it’s definitely great to view it post-reading. This is a really special book, covering topics I haven’t seen tackled in middle grade before with so much humor and longing. I loved Star from the first few pages, and that love only grew as I read.

MUST READ and share with the young people you love!

Starred Kirkus review for How It Went Down!

cloudbusterpress:

image

Via Kirkus:

"A racially charged shooting reveals the complicated relationships that surround a popular teen and the neighborhood that nurtured and challenged him… 

Magoon skillfully tells the story in multiple, sometimes conflicting, voices.

This sobering yet satisfying novel leaves readers to ponder the complex questions it raises.”

This is definitely one to pre-order!

Eek! I’m so psyched for this much-needed book!

yainterrobang:

NEW RELEASES: SEPTEMBER 2
Here’s a selection of some of the new YA novels hitting the shelves this week (September 2 - 8). For more on new releases and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our biweekly newsletter!

100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 2nd
Finn embarks on a road trip with Cade to visit their college of choice in Oklahoma. When an accident happens and the boys become unlikely heroes, they take an eye-opening detour away from everything they had planned.

Anatomy of a Misfit by Andrea Portes
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: September 2nd
Outside, Anika is the third most popular girl in school. Inside, she’s a freak. So when former loner Logan McDonough shows up one September hotter, smarter, and more mysterious than ever, Anika knows she can’t get involved.

Blackfin Sky by Kat Ellis
Publisher: Running Press Kids
Release date: September 2nd
When Sky falls from Blackfin Pier and drowns on her sixteenth birthday, the whole town goes into mourning – until she shows up three months later like nothing happened.

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 2nd
Wren has been content to stay in her best friend Allie’s shadow. But when Tim, the most intriguing guy in school, starts hanging out with Ally and Wren, jealousy is unavoidable, but not the kind Wren expects.

Destined for Doon (Doon #2) by Carey Corp & Lorie Langdon
Publisher: Blink
Release date: September 2nd
When Duncan shows up and informs Kenna that Doon needs her, she doesn’t need to think twice. But even if Kenna can save the enchanted kingdom, her happily ever after may still be in peril.

The Dolls (The Dolls #1) by Kiki Sullivan
Publisher: Balzer + Bray
Release date: September 2nd
After murder strikes and Eveny discovers that everything she believes about herself, her family, and her life is a lie, she must turn to a group of beautiful, untrustworthy friends known as the Dolls for answers.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: September 2nd
Caddie can’t stop thinking that if she keeps from touching another person’s skin, her parents might get back together… which is why she wears full-length gloves to school and covers every inch of her skin.

Feuds by Avery Hastings
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin
Release date: September 2nd
Like all Priors, Davis has spent her whole life smarter, stronger, and more graceful than the lowly Imperfects, or “Imps.” Then Davis meets Cole, a boy who leaves her with more questions each time he disappears.

The Girl and the Clockwork Cat by Nikki McCormack
Publisher: Entangled Teen
Release date: September 2nd
After a near-disastrous heist leads teenage thieves Maeko and Chaff to a mysterious clockwork cat and two dead bodies, Maeko is thrust into a murder mystery that may cost her everything she holds dear.

Heir of Fire (Throne of Glass #3) by Sarah J. Maas
Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s Books
Release date: September 2nd
Lost and broken, Celaena Sardothien’s only thought is to avenge the savage death of her dearest friend: as the King of Adarlan’s Assassin, she is bound to serve this tyrant, but he will pay for what he did.

Hider, Seeker, Secret Keeper by Elizabeth Kiem
Publisher: Soho Teen
Release date: September 2nd
When Daniela, Lana’s friend and chief rival at Russia’s world-famous Bolshoi ballet, is brutally attacked, Lana is given her coveted solo—an unlikely stroke of luck that makes Lana the chief suspect in the attack.

Jewel (The Lone City #1) by Amy Ewing
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: September 2nd
For girls like Violet, the Jewel means servitude. Violet, born in the Marsh, has been trained as a surrogate for the royalty—because in the Jewel the only thing more important than opulence is offspring.

La Vida Robot by Joshua Davis
Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux
Release date: September 2nd
A story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in their country—even as their country tried to kick them out.

Lie for Me: Griff’s Story (Find Me #0.5) by Romily Bernard
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: September 2nd
Get to know Wick Tate’s supercute hacker boyfriend, Griff, in this digital original novella from the talented author of Find Me and Remember Me.

MARY: The Summoning (Bloody Mary #1) by Hillary Monahan
Publisher: Disney Hyperion
Release date: September 2nd
When a summoning circle is broken, Bloody Mary slips through the glass with a taste for revenge on her lips. As the girls struggle to escape Mary’s wrath, friendships are torn apart, and lives are forever altered.

A New Darkness (The Starblade Chronicles #1) by Joseph Delaney
Publisher: Greenwillow
Release date: September 2nd
Tom Ward is the spook, the one person who can defend the county from bloodthirsty creatures of the dark. Fifteen-year-old Jenny wants to be Tom’s first apprentice—but a female spook is unheard of.

Practice Makes Perfect (Varsity #3) by Melanie Spring
Publisher: Poppy
Release date: September 2nd
The pressure is on as Chloe, Devin, Kate, and Emily practice Varsity-level stunts amidst the drama and jealousy of best friends, boyfriends, and frenemies. Can the girls band together to dominate at tryouts?

Puppy Love (Flirt #6) by A. Destiny & Catherine Hapka
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Release date: September 2nd
Lauren’s new puppy is driving the whole family crazy. Lauren falls for her new dog’s trainer, but would she be better matched with Jamal, a fellow fumbling owner her own age with an unruly mutt?

Sealed With a Lie (Two Lies and a Spy #2) by Kat Carlton
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 2nd
With her brother’s life hanging in the balance, Kari, Evan, Rita, Kale, and some new friends from Generation Interpol (G.I.) are on a race around Europe. Can they succeed before Charlie pays the ultimate price?

The Secret Sky by Atia Abawi
Publisher: Philomel
Release date: September 2nd
Set in present-day Afghanistan, this is the story of two teenagers, one Pashtun and one Hazara, who must fight against their culture, their tradition, their families, and the Taliban to stay together.

Shattered (Scorched #2) by Mari Mancusi
Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire
Release date: September 2nd
Trinity’s on the run with the last living dragon and twin brothers from a war-torn future. Connor may have betrayed his mission to kill Emmy, but he’ll do whatever it takes to prevent the coming dragon apocalypse.

Starry Night by Isabel Gillies
Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux
Release date: September 2nd
With his root-beer-brown Michelangelo eyes, Nolan changes the way Wren’s heart beats. What happens to your life when everything changes? How much do you give up? How much do you keep?

Trial by Fire (The Worldwalker Trilogy #1) by Josephine Angelini
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
Release date: September 2nd
Lily wishes she could just disappear and finds herself in a world overrun with monsters and ruled by powerful women called Crucibles. Strongest of them all is Lillian… Lily’s other self in this alternate universe.

The Winter People by Rebekah L. Purdy
Publisher: Entangled Teen
Release date: September 2nd
Salome discovers she’s a key player in a world she’s tried for years to avoid. At the center of this world is the strange and beautiful Nevin, whose interactions with Salome take her life in a new direction.

Zac and Mia by A.J. Betts
Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 2nd
Mia’s not your typical hospital patient. Zac can hear her fighting with her mom and the nurses through their shared wall. But soon they are trading messages that evolve into a bond neither sees coming.

The 100 Society by Carla Spradbery
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
Release date: September 4th
Grace will stop at nothing to carry out the rules of the 100 Society game: tagging 100 locations around the city. But with each step closer to the 100-mark she and her friends get, the higher the stakes become.

Always a Catch by Peter Richmond
Publisher: Philomel
Release date: September 4th
Once Jack makes the Oakhurst football team, he’s thrust into a foreign world—one of intense hazing, vitamin supplements, monkey hormones and steroids. Jack must decide how far he’s willing to go to fit in.

The Memory Keepers by Natasha Ngan
Publisher: Hot Key Books
Release date: September 4th
Seven and Alba will have to race against time to unlock the maze of The Memory Keepers - but can they keep themselves out of harm’s way before the London Guard - and Alba’s father - catches up with them?

All Those Broken Angels by Peter Adam Salomon
Publisher: Flux
Release date: September 8th
Richard has never questioned the shadow that keeps him company… until the shadow leads Richard to the place where her killer buried her bones. But Richard discovers the shadow may not be who she says she is.

Girl Nevermore by R.A. Desilets
Release date: September 8th
When her twin sister, Kayla, tries to commit suicide, Cooper blames herself. If she had only paid more attention… Desperate to understand her sister’s decision, Cooper starts down a dark path, discovering her own inner turmoil.

The Lonely by Ainslie Hogarth
Publisher: Flux
Release date: September 8th
Easter Deetz struggles with The Lonely—a debilitating condition that makes people lie. One day, Easter’s sister drops a boulder on her in The Woods. As she bleeds to death, she’s forced to face those lies.

No One Needs to Know by Amanda Grace & Mandy Hubbard
Publisher: Flux
Release date: September 8th
Olivia falls for her brother’s girlfriend, believing he isn’t serious about her, but when Liam confesses that he’s in love with Zoey, Olivia has to decide who deserves happiness more: her brother or herself?

Words and Their Meanings by Kate Bassett
Publisher: Flux
Release date: September 8th
Anna O’Mally doesn’t believe in the five stages of grief. Once a writer, Anna no longer believes words matter, until shocking discoveries– in the form of origami cranes– force her to redefine family and love.

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